SHOWING UP AT MY FRIENDS PARTY

t1m3l0rdh4nj1:

Having a pet is so weird. Like neither of you speak each other’s language and yet you form some strong bond by rubbing against each other and sleeping together and you might accidentally kick them in the face or step on their tail once in a while but at the end of the day you two are best buddies from entirely different species.

(via stevebaescemi)

fastcompany:

These companies adapt to the needs of women, so employees aren’t required to lean in too far.
Jane Park, CEO of the Seattle-based cosmetics company Julep, is fired up about the recent Hobby Lobby ruling.
I can tell it’s on her mind because one minute we’re talking about the design of nail polish bottles and a second later, she shifts gears, taking us in an unexpectedly political direction. “Last month, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that companies are people but I really don’t think that’s true,” Park says, out of the blue. “A company is not one human being; if anything, it’s a mini-society. There are many ways that rules of a company impact our lives more than the rules of a government.”
Park has spent decades thinking about the policies that affect women’s lives—it was the focus on her public policy degree at Princeton and her law degree at Yale—and today, as a businesswoman, it remains one of her biggest concerns. “As a head of a company, I see a huge opportunity to create the kind of society we want,” she tells me.
Her timing is great—we’re in a moment when company heads such as Sophie Amoruso of the online retailer Nasty Gal are proving that strong female leadership can be good for both morale and the bottom line.
It’s been a little over a year since Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In hit bookstore shelves, sparking a nationwide discussion about gender in the workplace. While many praised the book, calling it an invaluable manual for women keen to assert themselves at work, critics argued that Sandberg was urging women to adapt to a broken system rather than demanding that corporate America adapt to women’s needs. The good news for Sandberg detractors is that business leaders across the country are busy building a feminist workplace that allows women to thrive in their careers without having to lean in too far.
Read More>

fastcompany:

These companies adapt to the needs of women, so employees aren’t required to lean in too far.

Jane Park, CEO of the Seattle-based cosmetics company Julep, is fired up about the recent Hobby Lobby ruling.

I can tell it’s on her mind because one minute we’re talking about the design of nail polish bottles and a second later, she shifts gears, taking us in an unexpectedly political direction. “Last month, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that companies are people but I really don’t think that’s true,” Park says, out of the blue. “A company is not one human being; if anything, it’s a mini-society. There are many ways that rules of a company impact our lives more than the rules of a government.”

Park has spent decades thinking about the policies that affect women’s lives—it was the focus on her public policy degree at Princeton and her law degree at Yale—and today, as a businesswoman, it remains one of her biggest concerns. “As a head of a company, I see a huge opportunity to create the kind of society we want,” she tells me.

Her timing is great—we’re in a moment when company heads such as Sophie Amoruso of the online retailer Nasty Gal are proving that strong female leadership can be good for both morale and the bottom line.

It’s been a little over a year since Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In hit bookstore shelves, sparking a nationwide discussion about gender in the workplace. While many praised the book, calling it an invaluable manual for women keen to assert themselves at work, critics argued that Sandberg was urging women to adapt to a broken system rather than demanding that corporate America adapt to women’s needs. The good news for Sandberg detractors is that business leaders across the country are busy building a feminist workplace that allows women to thrive in their careers without having to lean in too far.

Read More>

Part of me suspects that I’m a loser, and the other part of me thinks I’m God almighty. — John Lennon (via norwegianwoods)

(via mygiu)

sephora:

HOW-TO: GET THE NO MAKEUP MAKEUP LOOK

A Sephora PRO Artist demonstrates this super-simple beauty routine designed to enhance all your best features.

SHOP SEPHORA>

sephora:

HOW-TO: GET THE NO MAKEUP MAKEUP LOOK

A Sephora PRO Artist demonstrates this super-simple beauty routine designed to enhance all your best features.

SHOP SEPHORA>

makeuptips-:

Eyeshadow Brushes: When it comes to eye brushes the amount of different bristles, shapes, sizes and densities are endless. I love using different eyeshadow brushes to create different looks and above are the most common variations on the market and the most used ones. Not all of these are essential for beginners or everyday makeup wearers, you can still create gorgeous eyeshadow looks with just a standard “C” eyeshadow brush, a precision crease brush and fluffy blending eyeshadow brush.
Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Newsletter | Youtube

makeuptips-:

Eyeshadow Brushes: When it comes to eye brushes the amount of different bristles, shapes, sizes and densities are endless. I love using different eyeshadow brushes to create different looks and above are the most common variations on the market and the most used ones. Not all of these are essential for beginners or everyday makeup wearers, you can still create gorgeous eyeshadow looks with just a standard “C” eyeshadow brush, a precision crease brush and fluffy blending eyeshadow brush.

Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Newsletter | Youtube

seedy:

HOW DO PEOPLE EMAIL TEACHERS SO QUICKLY I SIT THERE FOR 1 HOUR TRYING TO WORK OUT WHETHER TO START OFF WITH HI OR HELLO 

(via stevebaescemi)